Storage Cube

2017-02-02-10-02-49One of the problems that I appear to have in my house is that I lack storage solutions. Big storage and little storage alike. We seem to have lots and lots and lots of little ‘bits’ that don’t seem to have a home, so invariably end up scattered over surfaces, on sofas, floors etc. I have already started working on some simple box storage which I will post about later on, so simple you’d never believe it! But I wanted to try my hand at something a little bit prettier and more creative.

And so my first storage cube was born. Custom made to fit a window sill in my newly decorated cloakroom, and in some left over fabric from making a summer hat for Small. Here is how I did it….

Cut five 7in (18cm) squares each of the printed fabric (this 2017-01-16-12-50-22measurement was to fit onto the windowledge)
Cut five 6¾ in (17.5cm) squares of fabric for the lining, five of heavyweight fusible interfacing.Iron the interfacing to the wrong side of each of the printed squares. Right sides together pin two 2017-01-16-12-50-49adjacent squares together at the side edges. Sew them together using 1cm seam, and start and finish 1cm from the top and bottom edges to allow for the next join. This forms the ‘walls’ of the cube.

Pin the remaining printed square to the bottom edges of the other four, 2017-01-16-13-02-16with right sides together, and sew a 1cm seam around all four edges.
Repeat the process without the interfacing for the lining.2017-02-02-10-01-31

Turn the printed fabric cube inside out so that the right side is facing out. Place the lining cube inside this with the right side inside and line up. Tuck both top raw edges in and pin together. Sew a 1cm seam
around to finish off neatly.

Hope that all makes sense! It wasn’t the quickest of ways to make a cube I think, and it was a bit fiddly, but it worked. I have another idea, and as I need plenty of little storage solutions I am sure there will be more blog posts to come…

New Year, New Goals

Many of us, myself most definitely included, are living in survival mode. I feel like all I do is barely keep afloat, with so much going on, and going wrong, that I often feel really overwhelmed! I have this underlying feeling that this is not what I really want to be doing with my life, but have not yet figured out what it is that I actually do want.

Over the last few weeks in the lead up to the new year I have put aside some time to figure 20161225_124600out exactly that. What am I doing? What do I want? I made a mind-map of big areas in my life that I wanted to work on. Actually when I sat down and properly really thought about it (and not allowed myself to drift off to thinking about what to cook for tea, or how I was going to manage this month’s mortgage payment, or get another cup of coffee) it actually didn’t take me very long at all. It all sort of flowed out, like it had always been there, just that I had hidden it all away somewhere.
Once I started I realised that there were some key areas, so I tried to make some specific goals for each one. My next step needs to be to make those goals as smart as possible – specific, measurable, agreed, realistic and timely. Then I can figure out the steps that I need to take in order to achieve those goals. Break it down, little-by-little. This is usually where I feel overwhelmed at the thought of trying to tackle everything at once.  Instead, with the help of my trusty planner, I’m going to decide  which tasks to tackle in which month, and then try to spread them week-by-week, assigning small manageable tasks to days in my planner. Over the next few weeks, I can start making small changes, and gradually make the changes and do the work that I need to do.

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So, for example, with the house. I want to get the house sorted by the next long school holidays. So I have allocated two areas in my house to sort out each month.
Then for each month I have made a list of what needs to be tackled in each room, eg painting, sorting more storage space etc. Then as I come to write up that month’s planner, I can fit those tasks into specific days in the planner. Bite sized chunks.